What are the Up’s and Down’s?

Standing desks… “What’s the fuss, isn’t it just another gimmick?”

Not at all, in fact chiropractors welcome the new influx of table tops and have been waiting for them for years! When you stand, you require more active core muscles which help support your spine.

Muscles account for 80% of lower back support, so if they are regularly shut off for too long, problems arise.

“So standing is the answer to all of my problems?”

Unfortunately not, it is possible to stand badly too and that can lead to discomfort. What is also important is to be able to move and change between positions regularly and the stand up desks provide a great tool for this. It’s not just for “the guy with back pain”.

Alex Horne Chiropractic – Be outstanding! Ask your Alex how you could benefit.

Need a good stand up desk? Check out this independent review of the best on the market. http://www.reviews.com/standing-desk/

Are you legit to CrossFit?

CrossFit and HIIT keep my clinic busy! Not just with functional improvers, but often with injuries. So are you legit?

I am a big fan of Crossfit and High intensity interval training, as they promote a challenging and functional training enviroment.

The activities often push you to the extremes, be it power and speed, range of motion, or endurance.

But all too commonly I see athletes who aren’t mechanically ready for these extremes (see are you Fiit for HIIT).

For example, if your mechanics won’t let you execute a half-decent squat without compensating, leaking stress, is it sensible to do 100 explosive box jumps at speed?


It’s not what you do, it’s how you do it.


Granted, the perfect squat for example is hard to achieve and you shouldn’t mollycoddle people out of exercising. But it is vitally important to consider your limitations of flexibility, strength and control so you can work on them before leaping into the extremes.

So please, know your abilities, avoid injury and be legit to Crossfit!

Book a full functional exam online today

Alex Horne Chiropractic, too legit to quit.

Are you fiit for HIIT?

The popular ‘high intensity interval training‘ workout boasts many benefits, but are you ready to HIIT it?

If you, like many, jumped straight into it, just consider the advice below which I offer my  patients, courtesy of Joe McConkey (Boston Running Centre).


You’re ready for running HIIT workouts if you have:

  • Been running 4-5 times a week for at least 4 months
  • Regularly thrown in runs at paces 60 to 90 seconds per mile faster than crusing pace.
  • Been completing a weekly long run of at least 50 minutes.

In terms of strength and flexibility, you should be able to:

  • Hold a squat position for 90 seconds
  • Grab and touch your heel to your butt whilst standing, feeling only a minor quad stretch.

Start with one HIIT session a week, and build up to no more than two in a 10-day period.


This advice is tilted towards runners so isn’t for all HIIT sessions, which can be adapted to any sport. But just think twice before you train intensively, and make sure you are FIIT enough.

Alex Horne Chiropractic, back with a vengance!

 

 

Make a stand in the morning!

Many back pain sufferers know that catching 40 winks can be tough for your back.

“But why can rest make me sore?”

Between your vertebrae, there are discs made up of fluid and strong fibres helping to distribute pressures on the spine, for example during sitting, bending or running.

During sleep, the load on our spine is relieved, giving our discs a window in which to heal and hydrate. In the morning a typical spine is 1-2cm longer* (this can be up to 5cm in space!*) as hydration causes them to expand.

These lofty heights are lovely, however more fluid in the disc creates a pressure increase. Bending in the morning produces approximately four times more strain than during the day**, putting you at a greater risk of injury.

Discs have a poor blood supply, so rely upon rehydration and protein replenishment to stay healthy. Of all cartilage in the body, they wear down the fastest*, so ignore them at your peril!

We are largely immobile when asleep, so the facet joints, which are designed to move, can also feel stiff on waking.  (Problems aren’t usually caused, but accentuated by sleep).

Shows the two parts of vertebral discs.

“So what do I do?”

Mornings are quite a delicate time. Your discs need to depressurise without being subjected to heavy strain or big stretches, but, at the same time, your facet joints like to be stretched out.

The best advice is to slowly expose your back to you body’s weight before subjecting yourself to any stressors. Continue reading Make a stand in the morning!